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The Early Intervention Learning Network (EILN)

Overview

The New York State Department of Health Bureau of Early Intervention must provide for training to ensure capacity for service delivery to all eligible children and their families.  The Bureau of Early Intervention funds training contractors to offer training across New York State using approved early intervention curricula/courses. Training is provided to early intervention professionals and families.

The Early Intervention Learning Network (EILN) at the Just Kids Early Childhood Learning Center is the training contractor funded to provide this training throughout New York State.  You can visit their website (http://www.eilearningnetwork.com/)  for more information, or contact:

Early Intervention Learning Network (EILN)
Just Kids Early Childhood Learning Center
PO Box 12
Middle Island, NY 11953
Phone: (631) 924-2461
Fax: (631) 924-8777

Email:

Web:  http://www.eilearningnetwork.com

Stipend for Parents

Families are invited to attend training sessions.  A $25 stipend is available to support parent participation.

Early Intervention Courses

ASC-1     Advanced Service Coordination: Working with Families

A primary goal of Early Intervention is to enhance the family's capacity to meet the needs of their child. Families come to us with different strengths, different needs, and different priorities. If we are to be successful in working effectively in partnership with them, we need to have a clear sense of our respective roles and responsibilities and an appreciation of how attitudes, beliefs, values, and culture impact our interactions. This session explores a variety of strategies for developing and maintaining effective relationships with all families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe characteristics of families under stress and their various coping strategies.
  • Explain the role of the service coordinator in a family-centered community-based service delivery system.
  • Discuss the nature and significance of communication as an element of effective service coordination in EI.
  • Utilize family-centered solution-oriented strategies that support the family's meaningful involvement in EI and their use of other appropriate community resources.

CD-2     Cultural Diversity: Cultural Approaches and Practices

Each of us grows up in a "culture" that shapes how we view the world and how we and others behave in it. Our traditions and experiences shape our beliefs, attitudes, expectations, and behaviors. When we come into contact with others whose backgrounds and experiences are different from ours, we naturally are challenged by some of these differences. It is precisely at these points of diverse perspective that we have an opportunity to grow in understanding and appreciation of one another. In Early Intervention, our shared interest in the well-being of the child is the foundation on which we and families learn to work together. In this training session you are given the opportunity to expand your kno1wledge and understanding of diversity as well as acquire new skills in working with people. In addition you will learn how to access a variety of resources that will support your work with all families in early intervention. By the end of the session participants will be able to:

  • Describe cultural diversity; cultural competence; and differing expectations of the "culture" of special education and the cultures of families receiving early intervention services.
  • Apply problem solving techniques in responding to family situations, integrating philosophy of cultural diversity and family- centered practice.
  • Identify strategies for responding to families of infants and toddlers with disabilities so that their cultural perspectives are respected.
  • Apply group and individual learning from the session's activities to actual situations they encounter working with families of infants and toddlers with disabilities in New York State's Early Intervention Program.

CPG-AU     Clinical Practice Guideline: Autism/PDD

The health care system has a long history of using evidence-based guidelines in making decisions about assessment and intervention. Guidelines based upon credible scientific evidence provide us with a range of options from which to choose the best possible strategies to address individual needs. They provide the best opportunity for favorable outcomes and promote informed decision-making by both parents and professionals. The primary goal of this training session is to share current research about Autism/PDD and to assist you in learning to use evidence-base practices in your work with children who have Autism/PDD and their families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define and present a rationale for the use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the delivery of early intervention services.
  • Access the three NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline documents for Autism/PDD.
  • Use the NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline / Autism/PDD to help determine appropriate assessment and intervention strategies for young children with autism spectrum disorders.

CPG-CD     Clinical Practice Guideline: Communication Disorders

The health care system has a long history of using evidence-based guidelines in making decisions about assessment and intervention. Guidelines based upon credible scientific evidence provide us with a range of options from which to choose the best possible strategies to address individual needs. They provide the best opportunity for favorable outcomes and promote informed decision-making by both parents and professionals. The primary goal of this training session is to share current research about Communication Disorders and to assist you in learning to use evidence-base practices in your work with children who have Communication Disorders and their families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define and present a rationale for the use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the delivery of early intervention services.
  • Access the three NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline documents for Communication Disorders.
  • Use the NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline / Communication Disorders to help determine appropriate assessment and intervention strategies for young children with communication disorders.

CPG-DS     Clinical Practice Guideline: Down Syndrome

The health care system has a long history of using evidence-based guidelines in making decisions about assessment and intervention. Guidelines based upon credible scientific evidence provide us with a range of options from which to choose the best possible strategies to address individual needs. They provide the best opportunity for favorable outcomes and promote informed decision-making by both parents and professionals. The primary goal of this training session is to share current research about Down syndrome and to assist you in learning to use evidence-base practices in your work with children who have Down syndrome and their families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define and present a rationale for the use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the delivery of early intervention services.
  • Access the three NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline documents for Down Syndrome.
  • Use the NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline / Down Syndrome to help determine appropriate assessment and intervention strategies for young children with Down Syndrome.


CPG-HL     Clinical Practice Guideline: Hearing Loss

The health care system has a long history of using evidence-based guidelines in making decisions about assessment and intervention. Guidelines based upon credible scientific evidence provide us with a range of options from which to choose the best possible strategies to address individual needs. They provide the best opportunity for favorable outcomes and promote informed decision-making by both parents and professionals. The primary goal of this training session is to share current research about Hearing Loss and to assist you in learning to use evidence-base practices in your work with children who have Hearing Loss and their families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define and present a rationale for the use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the delivery of early intervention services.
  • Access the three NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline documents for Hearing Loss.
  • Use the Hearing Loss guidelines to determine appropriate assessment and intervention strategies for young children with hearing loss.


CPG-MD     Clinical Practice Guideline: Motor Disorders

The health care system has a long history of using evidence-based guidelines in making decisions about assessment and intervention. Guidelines based upon credible scientific evidence provide us with a range of options from which to choose the best possible strategies to address individual needs. They provide the best opportunity for favorable outcomes and promote informed decision-making by both parents and professionals. The primary goal of this training session is to share current research about Motor Disorders and to assist you in learning to use evidence-base practices in your work with children who have Motor Disorders and their families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define and present a rationale for the use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the delivery of early intervention services.
  • Access the three NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline documents for Motor Disorders.
  • Use the NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline / Motor Disorders to help determine appropriate assessment and intervention strategies for young children with motor disorders.


CPG-VI     Clinical Practice Guideline: Vision Impairment

The health care system has a long history of using evidence-based guidelines in making decisions about assessment and intervention. Guidelines based upon credible scientific evidence provide us with a range of options from which to choose the best possible strategies to address individual needs. They provide the best opportunity for favorable outcomes and promote informed decision-making by both parents and professionals. The primary goal of this training session is to share current research about vision impairment and to assist you in learning to use evidence-base practices in your work with children who have vision impairment and their families. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define and present a rationale for the use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the delivery of early intervention services.
  • Access the three NYS DOH Clinical Practice Guideline documents for Vision Impairment.
  • Use the guidelines to determine appropriate assessment and intervention strategies for young children with vision impairments.


EE     Introduction to Early Intervention Evaluation, Assessment, and Eligibility Determination

The purpose of this full-day course is to provide introductory information and training specific to the process of evaluation, assessment and eligibility determination in the NYS Early Intervention Program (EIP). The curriculum content is based on regulatory requirements, New York State Department of Health (SDOH) Policy Documents, Clinical Practice Guidelines issued by SDOH, and generally accepted concepts of Best Practice. It includes changes that have occurred in the Early Intervention Program subsequent to the adoption of revised regulations in June 2010.

The primary audience for this training will be qualified professionals involved in the Early Intervention (EI) evaluation process. A secondary audience may consist of families, service coordinators, Early Intervention Officials and/or their designees (EIO/Ds), and other individuals interested in learning more about EI Evaluation Process. By the end of this course, participants will learn:

  • the responsibilities of each Multidisciplinary Evaluation (MDE) team member
  • the required components of a Multidisciplinary Evaluation, including:
  • Standardized Assessment Tools
  • Determining initial and ongoing eligibility
  • Multidisciplinary Evaluation (MDE) Reports

EI-101     An Introduction to the New York State Early Intervention Program

If you are new to EI, the purpose of this training is to introduce you to the NYS Early Intervention Program. If you have been in EI for a while, this training will give you the opportunity to look at the NYS EI Program more holistically and connect guiding principles to practice. We will lay the groundwork by looking at the program's historical and legislative foundations and its mission, goals and key provisions, including parental rights and procedural safeguards. We will review and discuss all of the steps of the EI process: referral, initial and ongoing service coordination, evaluation, eligibility, Individualized Family Service Plan development / implementation, and transition. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the underlying principles of Early Intervention and why they are important to working with infants and toddlers and their families.
  • Identify and briefly describe each step of the Early Intervention process in New York State.
  • Identify sources of further information about Early Intervention.


IFSP     Individualized Family Service Plan

Developing a written plan in collaboration with families for providing early intervention services to an eligible child is a requirement under law. As importantly, it is a core component of a family-centered community-based approach to service delivery. This session will engage participants in a practical exploration of the principles that define a family-centered community-based approach and engage them in discussion/activities designed to translate these principles into practice within the context of the NYS regulations By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the requirements in PHL related to the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) process.
  • Learn about the principles underlying the development and implementation of the written IFSP.
  • Apply the information about the IFSP process to group discussions/activity and a sample vignette.


ISC     Introductory Service Coordination

Sensitive and effective service coordination is a vital component of Early Intervention. Along with a thorough working knowledge of the system, service coordinators must possess the skills necessary to work in partnership with families and other professionals. In recognition of this, NYSDOH requires that all service coordinators in EI participate in an approved official training as part of their approval process [Sec. 69-4.4(b) EIP Regulations]. This training is the official training approved by the State for this purpose. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the responsibilities of initial and ongoing service coordinators.
  • Apply regulatory requirements to their work as initial/ongoing service coordinators.
  • Accurately communicate information about the Early Intervention Program to families.


ISF-1     Information Session for Families: Learning Everyday

Children do learn everyday. They learn from the people who care for them and through their daily life experiences. Family and caregivers are their best "teachers". Infants and toddlers who have developmental challenges are no different in this respect. They learn by doing, by exploring, by being active participants in their families and in their communities. Child care providers have information and resources that can help shape a child's Individualized Family Service Plan so that it makes good use of daily routines and activities as learning experiences. This training explores ways that child care providers, families, and EI service providers can work together to develop and implement IFSP outcomes that are functional for the child and family. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the legal basis for providing early intervention services for infants and toddlers in "natural learning environments."
  • Access useful and practical information on how you can help your child learn within his/her natural daily routines and play activities.
  • Describe your role in developing and implementing an IFSP that reflects outcomes that are functional for your family and your child.
  • Identify specific strategies you can use to communicate effectively with service providers to ensure that your needs and priorities are understood and reflected in therapy goals and practice.


ISF-2     Information Sessions for Families: Transition

The purpose of this training is to assure that course participants will gain an understanding of the Early Intervention Program including historical background, legislation, program mission, goals and key provisions. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understanding the philosophy of family centered practice
  • Develop a greater understanding of the partnership between parents and Early Intervention service personnel
  • Recognize the importance of systematic planning for their children's future needs
  • Understand the information on the transition from the Early Intervention Program to services at age three
  • Procedural Safeguards afforded by the Early Intervention Program


NE     Natural Environments

The concept of working with young children and their families in "natural environments" goes well beyond the limits of "location". It involves working with children / families within the normal context of their days and weaving intervention into their interests, priorities, activities, and routines. For most of us this requires a re-examination of our attitudes, beliefs, and practices since we were likely not trained in this model of service delivery. The session includes a discussion of the elements of the "natural environments" approach, a look at model programs currently in use, specific strategies for integrating therapy into children's routines, and a variety of small group activities and case studies. By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the legal requirements and rationale for delivery of early intervention services in natural environments.
  • Discuss key concepts related to the provision of quality early intervention services in natural learning environments.
  • Select best practices to assist families in identifying routines and activities that are teaching and learning opportunities.
  • Apply the information to group activities and sample case studies.
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